Vicar's News - 31 January 2021

Updated: Sep 7

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What is it that possesses us? Is it Christ, or some part of our self, our own ‘demons’ that rule our lives and prevent us from acting in a manner that befits a disciple of Jesus. Modern medical scholarship moves us away from the ancient thinking that people who acted strangely were, in fact, possessed by some form of ‘evil spirit’. But in biblical times, demonic possession was used to explain behaviour that was not understood. Jesus uses that thinking here to demonstrate his power of the unknown.

In those days and possibly still the case - the use of a person’s name implied some control over them. Do you remember when your mother used your full name? – never a promising moment. In some instances Jesus prevents the ‘demon’ from naming him so as to ensure Jesus can demonstrate who truly has the power.

What rules our lives? Our own needs or those of God who, through our faith, can free is us from our inner demons and make us true disciples.

Receiving God’s gifts: recognising assets & abundance


Bishop Kate Prowd, formerly of St Stephen’s Gardenvale, in partnership with the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane and the ‘HeartEdge’ program developed by the Reverend Dr Samuel Wells at St Martin-in-the-Fields (London) is presenting a series of seminar and panel discussions introducing the HeartEdge ethos and its mission model (the 4 Cs – compassion, culture, commerce, congregation) to the Anglican Dioceses of Southern Queensland and Melbourne. This series will feature stories, case studies, ideas and approaches presented by clergy and lay leaders from both Dioceses.

Tickets are $25 per person and include access to all six sessions in the series. The sessions will be held via Zoom on Wednesday evenings throughout February to April, from 5.00–6.30 pm Brisbane time (6.00–7.30 pm Melbourne time). Bookings here.


Participants will receive an email with a link to join the Zoom meeting prior to the start of each session:


‘The pandemic & the future shape of church’

3 February, 6–7.30 pm Melbourne time

Sam Wells explores what church might need to look like and some opportunities for change as we emerge from the experience of the pandemic. The pandemic has been a complete nightmare, but can still be a gift, if it restores our clarity about our core purpose: to be with people in the night-time of their fear with faith, hope and love in the God who in Christ heals our past and frees our future.


'Living God's Future Now'

10 February, 6–7.30 pm Melbourne time

Christianity must take the present opportunity to be what it was always called to be: an alternative society, overlapping and sharing space with regular society, but living in a different time – that’s to say, modelling God’s future in our present.

The HeartEdge mission model of the 4 Cs offers a model of what a renewed society might look like. The interdependence of commerce, culture, compassion and congregational life is this model. It sustains itself, is open to the gifts of strangers, and exhibits the life of faith. This session will explore 4 Cs stories with clergy from the two Dioceses’.


‘What virtues are called for in a post COVID world?’

3 March, 6–7.30 pm Melbourne time

Sam Wells suggests that, through the nightmare of the pandemic, we’ve been given the greatest opportunity of our lifetimes to be pastors: to rediscover our core identity and to exercise our unique calling by doing some very simple things very well. But to do so may require a change of heart and soul and mind and strength; which is why we need the Beatitudes of Lockdown.


• 'The public role of the Church in complex times'

10 March, 6–7.30 pm Melbourne time

Exploring complexity/emergence work and conversational/dialogical approaches in relation to partnership. Working with those “on the way” into conversation; seeking a transformative spirituality and inclusive faith that speaks to real issues of today.


‘Investing in the Kingdom: The Divine Economy’

7 April, 5–6.30 pm AEST

Sam Wells explores the New Testament call to discipleship as an all-embracing thing requiring our heart and mind and soul and strength. The church has found it hard to live that call in practice and has adapted its ways to what we might call a partial approach. Any solution to the churches’ present woes about money that are based on a partial approach are unlikely to succeed, given that they are seeking to restore a flawed model. Therefore, a renewed all-embracing model is suggested that might give hope and reignite the imagination of our conversation about money.


• 'Good business & the Church'

14 April, 5–6.30 pm AEST

This session will explore the potential for hybrid structures that build community understanding of how we all flourish in complex working environments including church engagement with business/commercial enterprises including business ethics and pastoral care. Exploring the potential for hybrid organisations that stand with one foot in the business community and the other in the church and which work to hybrid structure and practice in an evolving form of secular public engagement for the Anglican Church of Australia.


Everyone is invited to participate.


You are also welcome to join the parish of St George’s East Ivanhoe which is supporting this initiative by running a group on Zoom to explore the material, ideas and reflections that come out of the presentations. If you would like to be part of that group please email the Vicar John Sanderson at jsanderson@melbourneanglican.org.au.

Sat@6 in the church


How great that our Sat@6 service has outgrown the space available in the Pioneer Chapel under the current COVID-19 restrictions. We will be having our services in the church until those limitations are removed and we can comfortably sit closer together.


We are grateful for the piano accompaniment previously provided by James Hardy for this service. Calvin Bowman will be providing the music for the service, principally on the organ and we will be occasionally joined by cellist Clara Schütz.


Clara began studying cello at the age of five in Bendigo. She travelled to Melbourne between 1987 and 1992 to study with Sarah Cuming. She gained her AMusA while still in school and performed with the Bendigo Symphony Orchesra. In 1994 she received First Prize in the 1994 National Cello Competition held in Wagga Wagga, NSW, winning a $13000 Benedict Lang cello. In 1995 she won the Hepzibah Menuhin Award for strings and the 3MBS-FM Performer of the Year competition. She completed her Bachelor of Music degree with Honours in 1997 studying with Nelson Cooke and Christian Wojtowicz, later travelling to England to continue her studies. She has played with the State Orchestra of Victoria and has taken masterclasses with Georg Faust, Ralph Kirshbaum and Maude Tortellier. In 1997 she travelled to England to continue her studies.

Baptism in the Bay


Last Sunday Michelle baptised Bo Liu on Brighton Beach accompanied by a group of parishioners.


We welcome her into the Church of God and look forward to her being among us at the 10am service.

Refreshments at 10am service


This weekend we are reintroducing refreshments after the 10am service. Because of Diocesan restrictions on the provision of food served by parishes, under the Parish’s COVIDSafe plan these will be limited, at this stage, to tea, coffee, mineral water, or cordial. All the cups will be disposable, so please place your finished cups and napkins in the bins provided in the narthex. Biscuits individually served on napkins (to avoid cross-contamination) will be available too.

This week at St Andrew’s


Click here to see our calendar of services and events

Advance notice for your diaries


mainly music will recommence on Monday 1 February


St Andrew’s Choir returns to church on next Sunday at 10am, when we will be commissioning the new Choir members. There will be a barbeque following that service, courtesy of the Choir Parents (SACPA), so please remain for the service and mingle with the choristers and their parents and families.


主任牧师寄语– 31 January 2021

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占据我们心的是什么?是基督,还是我们自身的一部分,我们自己的“恶鬼”统治着我们的生活,阻止我们以适合耶稣的门徒的方式行事。现代医学使我们摆脱了古老的思想,即行为异常的人实际上被某种形式的“邪灵”所附体。但是在圣经时代,恶鬼的占有被用来解释人们无法理解的行为。耶稣在这里用这种思想来证明他对未知领域的能力。

在当时甚至可能现今仍然如此的情况下-呼喊人名意味着对他们的控制。您还记得母亲使用您的全名吗? –真不希望有那样的时刻。在某些情况下,耶稣阻止“鬼”称呼他,以确保耶稣可以证明谁真正拥有能力。

什么决定我们的生活?透过我们的信仰,是我们自己的需求或上帝的需求可以使我们摆脱内心的魔鬼,成为真正的门徒?